smalltown pres. Derrick May

smalltown pres. Derrick May

25th April 2013

Brown Alley

Down in the banks of our dark hearts, a city was carved. The walls etched into the wet sides of the Thalamus, the floor paved along the twisting Cortex plain.

Outside, the world spilled by like grey water does, in the race to chase the weary tide.

In the morning the curtains drew open, bins were tipped to the ground and the edges of the street curbs curled softly.

The morning’s consciousness threw the blanket from our bed as we lay waiting to sleep.

Our chests thudded in time with the shadows flickering on the ceiling. We slowly counted to zero.

It was then, the civilians crossed the Malleus Bone Bridge, to the city House lives in.

We will see you there.

 

smalltown Est. 2011

 

‘THIS WAS THE PLACE; THIS WAS TECHNO CITY.’

 

The philosopher, Mr Derrick May, returns to us this Anzac day, 2013. Following last year’s show and intimate Q&A, we graciously welcome our Detroit Daddy to impart on us again his celebration of creative existence. For those of us learned in Mayday’s musical legacy and tireless international touring, we can admit to sharing a natural inclination to comb our hair and sit up straight in his company. With over thirty-five years musical experience tingling on his fingertips, Mr May is an invaluable icon to cities all over the world. It’s nice to have the gentleman back in ours.

            Most of us have a friend who thinks they know something about the dance scene because they visited Europe and had a delicious bender at Panorama Bar. These friends irk us with their smug smiles but are easily impressed when we bestow on them Ben Klock will be joining Derrick May on Anzac Day for one show only. (Those silly, smug friends; the Klocktower has been playing his heavy, hypnotic deep-grooves long before they discovered 118 bpm at Boutique, where they were papped in Beat magazine fingering one of your mates.) Klock is famous for fierce sets that take you all through the night. His mere presence on a bill is always a serious one for the two-step revellers. 

            The Bristolian is a passenger train of The Great Western Railway that first connected England to West England and Wales in 1838. Eats Everything, aka Daniel Pearce, is a Bristolian whose rise to electronic recognition from Bristol’s West Country Bass Central is comparable to a large object moving at high speeds. With support from the likes of Pete Tong, Claude Von Stroke and Jamie Jones, Eats Everything has our vote as the most popular in his class. 2013 is going to be huge for Pearce, and we get to kick-off his summer leg.

Three different generations of House music, one venue, one show only.

Stay tuned boppers.

N

Anzac day